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Apigenin, chrysin, and luteolin selectively inhibit chymotrypsin-like and trypsin-like proteasome catalytic activities in tumor cells.
Planta Med. 2010 Feb;76(2):128-32–Authors: Wu YX, Fang X
The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has an important role in regulating apoptosis and the cell cycle. The function of proteasomes is mediated by three main catalytic activities: (1) chymotrypsin-like (CT-L), (2) trypsin-like (T-L), and (3) peptidylglutamyl peptide hydrolyzing (PGPH). Recently, proteasome inhibitors have been revealed to have an antitumor effect, and have been used to treat cancers such as multiple myeloma. Previous studies have reported that some flavonoids can inhibit proteasome activity in tumor cells. To further investigate the proteasome-inhibitory mechanism of flavonoids, we examined the effects of the plant flavonoids apigenin, chrysin, and luteolin on the three individual catalytic activities in various cancer cell lines. Using fluorogenic substrates specific for proteasome catalytic subunits, we demonstrated the subunit specificity of each flavonoid. Addition of apigenin, chrysin and luteolin inhibited CT-L and T-L catalytic activities in a dose-dependent manner, whereas their effect on PGPH catalytic activity was weak. Our study suggested that these flavonoids have a specific role in inhibition of CT-L and T-L proteasome catalytic activities.—PMID: 19653143 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
 
Recipe 4 –
Take 2 bundles of parsley with 1 bundle of dandelion ( you can add 1-2 sprigs of Rosemary ) and add a sprig or 2 of peppermint—add water into a blender—and blend till all purreed—then strain and add to glass jar—and use as much as you can handle 1-2 oz per use would be a good place to start
 
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Show of the week June 18 2010
Paper Industry Tests Genetically Altered Trees
Mystery Crop Damage Threatens Hundreds Of Acres
Green Tea Boosts Production Of Detox Enzymes, Rendering Cancerous Chemicals Harmless
Digestive Process Affects Anti-Cancer Activity Of Tea In Gastrointestinal Cells
Recipe a1— Recipe a2
 
Paper Industry Tests Genetically Altered Trees
Paper industry to plant test forests of genetically altered eucalyptus in 7 Southern states
The commercial paper industry’s plans to plant forests of genetically altered eucalyptus trees in seven Southern states have generated more cries from critics worried that such a large introduction of a bioengineered nonnative plant could throw natural ecosystems out of whack. –ArborGen, a biotechnology venture affiliated with three large paper companies, got U.S. Department of Agriculture approval last month for field trials involving as many as 250,000 trees planted at 29 sites during the next few years. Much smaller lots of the genetically altered trees have been growing in some of the states for years. –Australian eucalyptus trees grow faster than native hardwoods and produce high-quality pulp perfect for paper production, but thus far, they have been able to thrive only in very warm climates. South Carolina-based ArborGen genetically altered the trees to withstand freezing temperatures, and the idea with the test forests is to see how far north they can now be grown.–The test sites will cover a total of about 300 acres in Florida , South Carolina , Texas , Alabama, Mississippi , Georgia and Louisiana.—While genetically engineered crops such as corn and soybeans have become common, ArborGen’s experiment marks the first large planting of designer trees in the United States. The company says plantations of hearty, faster-growing eucalyptus could produce more timber in a smaller area and allow conservation of natural forests.—But critics say that despite the USDA’s assurance that the trees pose no environmental threat, not enough is known about their effect on natural surroundings.—“We have many reservations about it,” said Neil J. Carman, a biologist who serves on the Sierra Club’s genetic engineering committee. “We don’t think the scientific evidence is in yet that says this is a good idea.”—Anne Petermann, executive director of the activist group Global Justice Ecology Project, said eucalyptus trees are invasive, require vast amounts of water that could reduce groundwater levels, and increase the wildfire risk because they are so flammable—This is quite a dangerous tree to be mass planting,” Petermann said. —But ArborGen CEO Barbara Wells said eucalyptus trees have not proven invasive in dozens of tropical countries where they are widely grown on plantations. Also, ArborGen genetically modified the trees to limit their ability to disperse seed and spread. Although the new field trials will significantly increase the number of genetically engineered trees being grown, Wells called it “very confined research.”—“The total is 300 acres, but when you’re doing tree research, that really is very small acreage,” she said, noting that about 20,000 acres of genetically unaltered eucalyptus trees are already grown in central and southern Florida for production of wood chips and mulch. The new test forests will show whether the genetically altered trees can thrive farther north in Florida, where freezing temperatures can occur in the winter.—Donald Rockwood, a professor emeritus in the University of Florida’s School of Forest Resources and Conservation, has worked for about 30 years on developing eucalyptus trees that thrive in Florida. He uses traditional breeding techniques, not genetic modification.—The genetically unaltered trees growing in controlled plantations in Florida have not proven invasive, are relatively efficient users of water and are no more flammable than other hardwoods, said Rockwood, who was hired by ArborGen to do a report on eucalyptus trees’ invasiveness because of his experience working with them at the university.—Still, Rockwood said, introduction of any genetically altered species poses risks. For example, the gene that makes the trees resistant to cold could be transferred to surrounding plants, allowing them to spread farther north than nature intended.–“It certainly needs to be done carefully, it needs to be regulated and there needs to be a period of well-defined observations,” Rockwood said.–The ArborGen trees will be planted in seven counties throughout Florida, four counties each in South Carolina and Texas , two each in Alabama and Mississippi and single counties in Georgia and Louisiana. Rockwood said they can grow about 25 feet per year and be ready to harvest in less than three years. ArborGen is a joint venture of International Paper , MeadWestvaco and Rubicon Ltd.
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Mystery Crop Damage Threatens Hundreds Of Acres
Shaun Chaiyabhat —6:21 PM CDT, June 1, 2010
FAST FACTS:
Small dots appear to “burn” through leaves
Area affected is along Tipton and Shelby County line
Farmers afraid they may lose their entire crop
(Memphis 6/1/2010) A mystery is unfolding across MidSouth farms.
Something is killing crops, trees, even weeds and nobody can explain why.
Farmers are scratching their heads and some are worried their crops may be lost to the mysterious plague.—-It’s happening along a large swath of land near the Shelby and Tipton county border along Herring Hill Road and elsewhere near the Mississippi River bottoms.—Tiny dots appear to have burned onto leaves of all types of plants, and they appear different depending on the plant.—On corn stalks, the dots seem to turn white in the center.—On other plants, a white dust speckles the leaves and then destroys the green life underneath.—“We found it all in the herbs, in the flowers, in the plum tree, in the weeds,” said organic farmer Toni Holt. “It’s apparently in everything.”–Holt grows organic produce that she sells at area farmers’ markets.—As she and other farmers inspect the new growth covered in the perplexing plague, they fear their entire crop may be lost. Less than ten miles from Holt’s crops, the damage could possibly hit hundreds of acres of corn at Wilder Farms.–It appears to have hit everything in its path.—There does not seem to be anything in common with the affected plants.–The Holts raise organic crops, so they don’t spray pesticides on any of their fruits and vegetables.—The first thought among some was a new parasite or insect caused the damage, but Wilder farms sprays pesticides and the damage there is exactly the same.–Farmers first noticed the damaging dots over the weekend.—Then Holt came home to find baby birds dead in their nests.—“There are two dead birds hanging out of two different bird houses, so we’re concerned about that. We don’t know if it’s related, but it’s alarming,” said Holt. “We’ve got horses, we’re concerned about the horses on the grass. We’ve got chickens. We sell our eggs at the market.”–Farmers we spoke with are convinced something in the air caused this damage.
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Green Tea Boosts Production Of Detox Enzymes, Rendering Cancerous Chemicals Harmless
ScienceDaily (Aug. 12, 2007) — Concentrated chemicals derived from green tea dramatically boosted production of a group of key detoxification enzymes in people with low levels of these beneficial proteins, according to researchers at Arizona Cancer Center. –These findings, published in the August issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, suggest that a green tea concentrate might help some people strengthen their metabolic defense against toxins capable of causing cancer.—In a study of 42 people, the concentrate — composed of chemicals known as green tea catechins in amounts equal to that found in 8-16 cups of green tea — boosted production of the enzymes, which belong to the glutathione S-transferase (GST) family, by as much as 80 percent in some participants.—-GST enzymes are believed to be crucial to the body’s defense against cancer-causing chemicals and other toxins, according to the study’s lead investigator, H.-H. Sherry Chow, Ph.D., a research associate professor at the University of Arizona. They modify the cancer-causing molecules that would otherwise damage cellular DNA, thus rendering them inert. “They actually convert known carcinogens to non-toxic chemicals, and studies have shown a correlation between deficient expression of these enzymes and increased risk of developing some cancers,” Chow said. “Expression of this enzyme varies dramatically in people due to genetic variation and environmental factors,” Chow added. “Green tea catechins somehow increase gene expression of these enzymes, which can be an advantage to people with low levels to start with.”—Green tea has long been of interest to researchers given studies that have shown populations in which it is often consumed, such as the Chinese and Japanese, generally have lower rates of cancer. To find out if green tea can protect against cancer, the NCI has sponsored a number of rigorous scientific studies testing capsules of the extract, Polyphenon E, that have been prepared in Japan to meet exact specifications. These pills contain epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a catechin known for its potent antioxidant activity, and are currently being tested against a variety of cancers in clinical trials.—This study was designed to see if green tea catechin concentrate had any effect on the levels of GST enzymes in healthy individuals research that could explain the tea’s anti-cancer properties. Healthy volunteers were asked to abstain from consuming any tea or tea-related products for four weeks. At the end of this “washout period,” blood was drawn and baseline GST enzyme levels were determined for each participant. Then, the volunteers were asked to take four Polyphenon E capsules, for a total of 800 milligrams of EGCG, each morning on an empty stomach for four weeks and to abstain from drinking tea or eating many cruciferous vegetables, which contain other beneficial chemicals. Another blood sample was taken after four weeks, and GST activity was determined. —-Researchers found that use of Polyphenon E enhanced GST activity when data from all participants were included for analysis. But it had its most significant effect in volunteers whose baseline blood measurements showed low GST activity — an 80 percent increase compared to baseline GST activity. Activity did not change in volunteers with medium GST expression, or in those with the highest levels, GST seemed to decrease slightly although researchers believe that decline was due to random variation.—“This is the first clinical study to show proof that chemicals in green tea can increase detoxification enzymes in humans,” Chow said. “There may be other mechanism in play by which green tea may protect against cancer development, but this is a good place to start.”–The NCI supported the study and researchers from NCI also participated in conducting the study.—-Story Source: The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by American Association for Cancer Research.
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Digestive Process Affects Anti-Cancer Activity Of Tea In Gastrointestinal Cells
ScienceDaily (Apr. 10, 2008) — Increased consumption of teas rich in catechins is associated with reduced risk of stomach, colon and other gastrointestinal cancers. However, the effects of digestion on the anticancer activity of tea catechins have largely been ignored. A study by nutrition researchers at The Ohio State University and Purdue University found that the digestive process could both alter the structure of the tea catechins and their anticancer activity. –Fabiola Gutierrez Orozco, a graduate student in the laboratory of Dr. Joshua Bomser, The Ohio State University, presented study results on April 7 at Experimental Biology 2008 in San Diego. Other co-authors of the study are Dr. Marti Cenky of Ohio State; Dr. Mario G. Ferruzzi and Rodney Green, a graduate student in the Ferruzzi laboratory, of Purdue University. The presentation at Experimental Biology is part of the scientific program of the American Society for Nutrition.—Using a model simulating gastric and small-intestinal digestion, the researchers treated gastric cancer cells and colon cancer cell lines with digested and undigested (parent) extracts of green, tea, black tea, and a combination of the most active tea catechins (EGCG/EGC). In colon cells, digestion of both the green tea extracts and the catechin combination significantly reduced anticancer activity compared to undigested parent extracts. Black tea, on the other hand, showed the same anticancer activity for both parent and digested extracts.—Digestion and the type of tea made a difference in terms of anticancer activity. In addition, the anticancer activity of the tea extracts differed between gastric and colon cancer cell lines. In gastric cancer cells, the undigested extracts were 50 percent less effective than in colon cancer cells.
What does the new study show us?
First, says Dr. Bomser, it points out that better understanding the impact of digestion on tea could lead to changes in how we formulate products in order to protect and enhance their anticancer activity. It also could change how we prepare tea now. In a study from Dr. Ferruzzi’s laboratory published last November, for example, he found that adding citrus (such as lemon juice) or ascorbic acid to green tea protected the catechins from digestive degradation. Lemon juice caused 80 percent of tea’s catechins to remain available for the body to absorb.—Second, say the researchers, some of the digestive changes may impact anti-cancer activities. Work in Dr. Ferruzzi’s laboratory has shown that digestion can alter the structure of polyphenols, degrading and destroying some while forming others. His laboratory is currently identifying these new compounds and testing their own anticancer activity.—Third, the findings of digestive impact on tea catechins are likely also true for other bioactive compounds in foods. Dr. Bomser points out that the active compound in broccoli, for example, is not released until chewing and the digestive process begins. How do we formulate food to prevent degradation and perhaps enhance anti-cancer activity?—And fourth, say the researchers, the epidemiological findings of protective impact of teas rich in the unstable, easily degraded catechins may indicate that other compounds in tea are responsible, in part, for this anticancer activity. Further research is necessary to identify these compounds and to understand the impact of digestion on their anticancer activity.—-Funding for this work comes from the National Cancer Institute.–Story Source: The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS.
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Recipe a1
Take 1 tablespoon of green tea ( gun powder green tea—or anything you may have ) add 2-3 sprigs of dried rosemary—boil them for a tea—extract them to make something stronger—tincture them to make them even more potent and you can even distill them—Rosemary has over 20 antioxidants as well as antinflammatory components as well so in combination you will see s synergy with these 2
Recipe a2
Take your 1-2 tablespoon of gun powder tea ( any green tea) and add equal amounts of Ascorbic Acid and blend til fused or saturated with each other –Sift then place powder in a capsule and use as a supplement—Again the ascorbic acid increases the effect by up to 80%
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Show of the Week June 21 2010
Polyphenols in Red Wine and Green Tea Halt Prostate Cancer Growth
Essential Oils to Fight Superbugs
Cloves Are ‘Best’ Natural Antioxidant, Spanish Study Finds
Agricultural Aromatherapy- Lavender Oil As Natural Herbicide
Natural Ingredient Preserves Meat Quality In Precooked Supermarket Offerings
Recipe B1 –Recipe B2
Polyphenols in Red Wine and Green Tea Halt Prostate Cancer Growth, Study Suggests
In what could lead to a major advance in the treatment of prostate cancer, scientists now know exactly why polyphenols in red wine and green tea inhibit cancer growth. —ScienceDaily (June 11, 2010) — In what could lead to a major advance in the treatment of prostate cancer, scientists now know exactly why polyphenols in red wine and green tea inhibit cancer growth. This new discovery, published online in The FASEB Journal, explains how antioxidants in red wine and green tea produce a combined effect to disrupt an important cell signaling pathway necessary for prostate cancer growth. This finding is important because it may lead to the development of drugs that could stop or slow cancer progression, or improve current treatments.—“Not only does SphK1/S1P signaling pathway play a role in prostate cancer, but it also plays a role in other cancers, such as colon cancer, breast cancer, and gastric cancers,” said Gerald Weissmann, MD, editor-in-chief of The FASEB Journal. “Even if future studies show that drinking red wine and green tea isn’t as effective in humans as we hope, knowing that the compounds in those drinks disrupts this pathway is an important step toward developing drugs that hit the same target.”—Scientists conducted in vitro experiments which showed that the inhibition of the sphingosine kinase-1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) pathway was essential for green tea and wine polyphenols to kill prostate cancer cells. Next, mice genetically altered to develop a human prostate cancer tumor were either treated or not treated with green tea and wine polyphenols. The treated mice showed reduced tumor growth as a result of the inhibited SphK1/S1P pathway. To mimic the preventive effects of polyphenols, another experiment used three groups of mice given drinking water, drinking water with a green tea compound known as EGCg, or drinking water with a different green tea compound, polyphenon E. Human prostate cancer cells were implanted in the mice and results showed a dramatic decrease in tumor size in the mice drinking the EGCg or polyphenon E mixtures.—“The profound impact that the antioxidants in red wine and green tea have on our bodies is more than anyone would have dreamt just 25 years ago,” Weissmann added. “As long as they are taken in moderation, all signs show that red wine and green tea may be ranked among the most potent ‘health foods’ we know.”—Story Source: The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS.—Journal Reference:—L. Brizuela, A. Dayon, N. Doumerc, I. Ader, M. Golzio, J.-C. Izard, Y. Hara, B. Malavaud, O. Cuvillier. The sphingosine kinase-1 survival pathway is a molecular target for the tumor-suppressive tea and wine polyphenols in prostate cancer. The FASEB Journal, 2010; DOI: 10.1096/fj.10-160838
 
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Essential Oils to Fight Superbugs
ScienceDaily (Apr. 4, 2010) — Essential oils could be a cheap and effective alternative to antibiotics and potentially used to combat drug-resistant hospital superbugs, according to research presented at the Society for General Microbiology’s spring meeting in Edinburgh.—Professor Yiannis Samaras and Dr Effimia Eriotou, from the Technological Educational Institute of Ionian Islands, in Greece, who led the research, tested the antimicrobial activity of eight plant essential oils. They found that thyme essential oil was the most effective and was able to almost completely eliminate bacteria within 60 minutes.—–The essential oils of thyme and cinnamon were found to be particularly efficient antibacterial agents against a range of Staphylococcus species. Strains of these bacteria are common inhabitants of the skin and some may cause infection in immunocompromised individuals. Drug-resistant strains, such as meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are extremely difficult to treat. “Not only are essential oils a cheap and effective treatment option for antibiotic-resistant strains, but decreased use of antibiotics will help minimise the risk of new strains of antibiotic resistant micro-organisms emerging,” said Professor Samaras.—Essential oils have been recognised for hundreds of years for their therapeutic properties, although very little is still known about how they exert their antimicrobial effects in humans. Australian aborigines used Tea tree oil to treat colds, sore throats, skin infections and insect bites and the remedy was sold commercially as a medicinal antiseptic from the early 20th century. Various scientific studies have demonstrated that essential oils are not only well tolerated, but are effective against a range of bacterial and fungal species. Their therapeutic value has been shown for the treatment of a variety of conditions, including acne, dandruff, head lice and oral infections.—The Greek team believes essential oils could have diverse medical and industrial applications. “The oils — or their active ingredients — could be easily incorporated into antimicrobial creams or gels for external application. In the food industry the impregnation of food packaging with essential oils has already been successfully trialed. They could also be included in food stuffs to replace synthetic chemicals that act as preservatives,” they said.–Story Source: The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by Society for General Microbiology, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
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Cloves Are ‘Best’ Natural Antioxidant, Spanish Study Finds
A new study in by Spanish researchers suggests that cloves are the best natural antioxidant. —ScienceDaily (Mar. 19, 2010) — Using spices eaten in the Mediterranean diet as natural antioxidants is a good way forward for the food industry, given the beneficial health effects of these products. This has been shown by researchers from the Miguel Hernández University (UMH), who have put the clove in first place.–Researchers from the Miguel Hernández University have identified cloves (Syzygium aromaticum) as the best antioxidant spice, due to the fact they contain high levels of phenolic compounds, as well as having other properties.—“Out of the five antioxidant properties tested, cloves had the highest capacity to give off hydrogen, reduced lipid peroxidation well, and was the best iron reducer,” says Juana Fernández-López, one of the authors of the study and a researcher at the UMH.—As a result, the research study published in the latest issue of the Flavour and Fragrance Journal ranks this spice as the best natural antioxidant.—“The results show that use of the natural oxidants occurring in spices used in the Mediterranean diet, or their extracts, is a viable option for the food industry, as long as the organoleptic characteristics of the food product are not affected,” adds the researcher.—“These substances exhibit high antioxidant capacity, and could have beneficial effects for health,” says the researcher—The team also evaluated the antioxidant effect of the essential oils from other spices used in the Mediterranean diet — oregano (Origanum vulgare), thyme (Thymus vulgaris), rosemary, (Rosmarinus funcionarios cinalis) and sage (Salvia funcionarios cinalis).—The objective of the study is to enable these spices to be incorporated into food products (above all meat products) as natural antioxidants.
Changing the food industry
“Lipid oxidation is one of the main reasons for foods deteriorating, and causes a significant reduction in their nutritional value, as well as loss of taste,” says Fernández-López.—These alterations lead to a reduction in the useful lifespan of the food product. To avoid such deterioration, the food industry uses synthetic antioxidants in its products. However, as these are chemical compounds, questions have been raised about their potential toxicity and side-effects.—As a result, there is a growing interest in using plant-based products (spices, aromatic and medicinal plants) with potential antioxidant activity, in order to replace the synthetic antioxidants with “natural” substances.—-Story Source: –The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by FECYT – Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS.—Journal Reference: Manuel Viuda-Martos, Yolanda Ruiz Navajas, Elena Sánchez Zapata, Juana Fernández-López y José A. Pérez-Álvarez. Antioxidant activity of essential oils of five spice plants widely used in a Mediterranean diet. Flavour and Fragrance Journal, 2010; 25 (1): 13 DOI: 10.1002/ffj.1951
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Agricultural Aromatherapy- Lavender Oil As Natural Herbicide
ScienceDaily (May 21, 2009) — Could essential oils extracted from lavender be used as a natural herbicide to prevent weed growth among crops? Research carried out in Italy and reported in the current issue of the International Journal of Environment and Health suggests the answer may be yes.—Elena Sturchio of the National Institute of Health and Safety at Work in Rome and colleagues there and at the Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, and the Department Crop Production, at Tuscia University, in Viterbo, have investigated the inhibitory effects on weed growth of aromatic oils, or mixtures of phytochemicals, from plants such as lavender, Lavandula officinalis.—Essential oils, are as the name suggests, often the plant’s “essence” in terms of odour. Essential oils are complex chemical mixtures of natural products made by the plant for its own purposes, including terpenes, alcohols, aldehydes and phenols. Indeed, several plant essential oils are present as natural inbuilt herbicides and pesticides.—Synthetic pesticides and herbicides have been in common use for decades and have protected crops from parasites, insects, bacteria, viruses, fungi, and eliminated weeds. However, by virtue of their design, these substances are toxic and in some cases thought to be carcinogenic. Their incorrect use or inadvertent exposure have been the focus of numerous studies on animal and human health, the results of which have led to serious initiatives to find alternative approaches to pest and weed control.—-Other researchers have investigated the potential of essential oils from cinnamon plants, and peppermint to prevent seed germination of some weed species found in the Mediterranean region.—Sturchio and colleagues have investigated the effects of lavender oil on root growth in a plant, Vicia faba in trials. This weed has large chromosomes and so was also amenable to studies in the laboratory that investigated the genetic toxicity of the essential oil on the weed. Their analysis showed the oil to be effective at killing the weed even at low concentration. Moreover, the oil affects growth of soil microbes and fungi involved in crop growth.—The team concludes that, “Essential oils could be useful as potential bioherbicides as an alternative strategy to the chemical remedy.” They add that, “The use of phytochemicals permits the development for more sustainable agriculture at low environmental impact. Further studies are now needed to evaluate use of such oils “in the field”.–The team points out that the oils would most likely be used either before planting or prior to transplantation of seedlings, so the essential oil would not have toxicity effects on the crop itself. Sturchio adds that, “essential oils are not accumulated in the environment, because of their low persistence due to the easy degradation by microbial and enzyme activity. This aspect could represent an advantage compared to the bioaccumulation of chemicals on soil.”—Story Source: The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by Inderscience, via AlphaGalileo.— Journal Reference Miriam Zanellato, Eva Masciarelli, Laura Casorri, Priscilla Boccia, Elena Sturchio, Mario Pezzella, Andrea Cavalieri, Fabio Caporali. The essential oils in agriculture as an alternative strategy to herbicides: a case study. International Journal of Environment and Health, 2009; 3 (2): 198 DOI: 10.1504/IJENVH.2009.024878
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Natural Ingredient Preserves Meat Quality In Precooked Supermarket Offerings
ScienceDaily (Dec. 3, 2007) — Grape-seed extract is a viable natural alternative to synthetic ingredients that preserve meat quality in pre-cooked, frozen and refrigerated ready-to-eat meals, such as individual diet entrees or family-sized trays of frozen lasagna, according to a new University of Illinois study published in the Journal of Food Science.—“In the last five years, the section of the supermarket that contains fully cooked, ready-to-eat products has grown tremendously as consumer demand for convenience foods has increased. I’d estimate that 10 percent of all meals served at home feature these foods,” said Susan Brewer, a U of I professor of food science.—-For years, the food industry has been using synthetic ingredients–BHA, BHT, and TBHQ–to preserve the quality of meats in precooked foods by slowing the oxidation of fats. But Brewer’s study shows that a natural product may be an even more effective antioxidant.—That product, grape-seed extract, is a byproduct of fermentation, and its efficacy is due mainly to its phenolic compounds, she said. —“We’ve known for years that certain natural compounds, including some herbs and spices, have powerful antioxidant activity. Food scientists have been trying to isolate the flavoring parts of these spices from the components that have the functional effects we’re looking for,” she said.—Brewer was frankly skeptical when a study to determine the effectiveness of grape-seed extract in preserving the quality of pre-cooked meats was suggested to her.—“But we’ve done three studies in a row now, and I’m a believer,” she said.—Brewer and her graduate student Martha Rojas compared the natural antioxidants oregano, rosemary, and grape-seed extract in a study that evaluated their effectiveness in cooked, reheated beef and pork at different concentrations, for different lengths of time, and at different temperatures.—The meat was then evaluated for oxidative markers and sensory attributes by a 10-member panel. “The higher concentration of grape-seed extract yielded better results than we see with synthetics, which is certainly not what you’d expect. Synthetics, after all, have been engineered to maximize effectiveness, but sometimes Mother Nature comes up with a better product.”—-Another plus was that the sensory panel couldn’t detect grape-seed extract in the products it tested, whereas foods containing oregano and rosemary retained an herbal odor. “They must be carrying some of the volatile aroma compounds at low levels,” the researcher said.—Studies are ongoing in Brewer’s lab, this time comparing the efficacy and sensory qualities of natural versus synthetic antioxidants.—-“I really think grape-seed extract is a viable, natural way to preserve meat quality in the precooked entrees that are so popular now,” she said. “And, when companies can use the word natural on a label, it’s attractive to consumers. It takes some of the guilt out of using a convenience food.”—Brewer and Rojas co-authored the study, which was funded by Kikkoman. —Story Source: The above story is reprinted (with editorial adaptations by ScienceDaily staff) from materials provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS.
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Recipe B1—Take your GSE and add 5-10 drops in a glass container then add 2 oz of distilled water and percuss this til there is a complete fusing—then add a spray mister and Now you can apply this on your meats you can add this to butter—anything that is consumed with fat you may want to spray on this so that when the food is in you it will assist in maintain a good healthy fat flow with the damaging side effects
Recipe B2 Take the essential oil of Lavender and add 5-10 drops in a glass and add just one cap of vodka to the this and then add the rest distilled water or reverse osmosis—shake well and then proceed to use a glass spray bottle and spray the plants
 
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Shows of the week June 25 2010
 
Straw Bale Gardening
Antioxidant and antimutagenic activity of Carum copticum fruit extracts
Ameliorative effect of ajwain extract on hexachlorocyclohexane-induced lipid peroxidation in rat liver.
Coffee Might Guard Against Head, Neck Cancers
Wine helps deter tooth decay
 
 
Straw Bale Gardening
Kent Rogers of Wake Forest has successfully cultivated a vegetable garden in bales of straw. Carolina Country’s report on his idea last year drew attention from gardeners and others across the state. Kent points out that the method produces good-looking, healthy plants without weeds, and is especially convenient for people who don’t have a large plot of ground to till, or who are physically unable to do a lot of kneeling, bending, raking and hoeing. Here is some of his advice for people interested in straw bale gardening.
Preparing Your Bales
It takes 10 days to prepare your bales.
Days 1–3: Water the bales thoroughly and keep them wet.
Days 4–6: Sprinkle the bales with 1/2 cup of ammonium nitrate (32-0-0) per bale per day, and water it well into the bales. I didn’t have any trouble finding ammonium nitrate from my local ag-supply store. They sold it in 40-pound bags. I have heard, however, that some people have had difficulty finding it in more urban settings. Ask around.
Days 7–9: Cut back to 1/4 cup of ammonium nitrate per bale per day and continue to water it in well.
Day 10: No more ammonium nitrate, but do add 1 cup of 10-10-10 fertilizer per bale and water it in well.
Day 11: Transplant your plants into the bales. I used a spatula to make a crack in the bale for each plant. Place the plant down to its first leaf and close the crack back together as best you can.
Straw bale gardening
I use containers a lot and raised beds are a must. Besides being easier on the back they help keep pests out of the garden. I have also set up most raised beds to be instant hoop greenhouses.–When my back was the worst I started doing hillside gardens and I even planted some of my crops in straw bales. Straw bale gardens are actually fun and have a unique look. The only thing with a straw bale garden is that it is best to use transplants. I have started the plants from seeds but my normal success rate is off so I cheat and go for the transplants!
Straw Bale Garden
To make a straw bale garden buy a few straw bales. How many you pick up will depend on how big you want your garden to be. A bale is usually about 2 foot by 3 or 4 foot in size.—Straw bales are better than hay bales, Hay has more weed seeds and why bring weeds into your yard?
Straw Bale Garden Design
Lay your straw bales out where you want your garden flat side down. You can lay them out in a line or get creative and make a design. I laid my garden out in a mini maze with enough room to get the mower between the bales. I also had a bench in the center so I had a fun place to sit.—The next step takes a few days. During this time you can be hardening off your transplants.—What you need to do is wet the straw bales down thoroughly several times a day for a couple of days. I also make a compost tea mix and let that soak in the top of the bales. This gives the bales a good deep soaking of water, which it will hold for a long time and the fertilizer soaks in and add nutrients to the bale that the plants will get.
Planting your Straw Bale Garden
Decide what plants you are going to plant so that you know how much space you want between plants. Next remove some of the straw where you want the plants. I usually take out 6 inches across and 8 inches deep. Fill the hole with good composting soil or a mix or garden soil and potting soil Water well and let sit for a few hours. Put more soil in if the soil level goes down.—I wait till its cloudy or close to 5 or 6p.m. in the afternoon when the sun isn’t so hot. Your transplants will appreciate being transplanted when the sun isn’t beating down on them.—Plant your transplants and water. After this garden is planted treat it like a normal garden. Water the plants when they need it and if it’s a very dry summer water the bales for a deep watering.—I have planted tomatoes, potatoes, squash, greens, peppers, gourds and flowers in the bales. I didn’t try tall plants like sunflowers. I also staked tomatoes and peppers just like I do in a regular garden.–When the season is over, harvest your crops. One thing I did do later in the fall was cover the sides of the bales with black plastic. This kept the bales warmer and my crops going a little longer.–After the season is done take the bales and add them to you compost pile. If you don’t have one this is the perfect time to start! You have great semi composted material to start one with.
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Antioxidant and antimutagenic activity of Carum copticum fruit extracts.
Toxicol In Vitro. 2010 Jun;24(4):1243-9 -Authors: Zahin M, Ahmad I, Aqil F
The ajowain (Carum copticum (L.)) is a popular spice and traditionally used in Indian system of medicine. Considering the importance of natural products in modern phytomedicine, the antioxidant and antimutagenic activities of C. copticum fruits extract and its fractions were evaluated. The methanol fraction showed highest antioxidant activity by phosphomolybdenum (2087.7 micromol) and DPPH assay (90.2%) followed by other fractions comparable to ascorbic acid and BHT. Based on antioxidant activity, methanol fraction was evaluated for antimutagenic potential against direct acting mutagens sodium azide ( NaN (3)) and methyl methane sulphonate (MMS) and indirect acting mutagens 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) and benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), using Salmonella typhimurium (TA97a, TA98, TA100, and TA102) tester strains. The methanolic fraction showed no sign of mutagenicity at tested concentrations (25-100 microg/plate). Antimutagenic activity was recorded with inhibition of mutagenicity ranging from 10.8% to 83.1% in a concentration dependent manner. The phytochemical analysis by IR, HPLC, GC-MS, and total phenolic assay revealed a high content of phenolic terpenoids. Further, characterization of active principle is needed to understand the mechanism of action and therapeutic efficacy in vivo.
PMID: 20149861 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
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Ameliorative effect of ajwain extract on hexachlorocyclohexane-induced lipid peroxidation in rat liver.
Food Chem Toxicol. 2009 Feb;47(2):279-82-Authors: Anilakumar KR, Saritha V, Khanum F, Bawa AS
Effect of ajwain extract on hexachlorocyclohexane-induced oxidative stress and toxicity in rats were investigated. Six groups of rats were maintained for 12 weeks as (1) Control; (2) HCH (300 mg/kg body weight) injected (3) 1% ajwain extract incorporated diet (4)1% ajwain extract incorporated diet+HCH (5) 2% ajwain extract incorporated diet and (6) 2% ajwain extract incorporated diet+HCH. Results revealed that HCH administration lead to an increase in hepatic lipid peroxidation associated with reduction in, levels of glutathione (GSH), activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Prefeeding of ajwain extract resulted in decreased hepatic levels of lipid peroxides and increased GSH, GSH-peroxidase, G-6-PDH, SOD, catalase and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities. At the same time there was a significant reduction in hepatic levels of HCH-induced raise in lipid peroxides as a result of the prefeeding the extract. Prefeeding of ajwain extract at 1% level to rats injected with HCH reverted the significant changes in catalase, G-6-PDH, GST and -glutamyl transpeptidase. HCH-induced formation of micronuclei in femur bone marrow was also reduced significantly. It was concluded that HCH administration resulted in hepatic free radical stress, causing toxicity, which could be reduced by the dietary ajwain extract.–PMID: 18940228 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
 
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Coffee Might Guard Against Head, Neck Cancers
Large analysis found regular drinkers were 39% less likely to get these malignancies
FRIDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) — Coffee may help protect against head and neck cancers, a new review finds.—Researchers analyzed nine studies collected by the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology consortium. They found that regular coffee drinkers (four or more cups a day) were 39 percent less likely to develop oral and pharynx cancers than people who didn’t drink coffee.—-“Since coffee is so widely used and there is a relatively high incidence and low survival rate of these forms of cancers, our results have important public health implications that need to be further addressed,” lead researcher Mia Hashibe, an assistant professor in the department of family and preventive medicine at the University of Utah, said in an American Association for Cancer Research news release.—“What makes our results so unique is that we had a very large sample size, and since we combined data across many studies, we had more statistical power to detect associations between cancer and coffee,” she added.–The study appears in the current issue of the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.—A number of recent studies have suggested that coffee may help prevent cancers, including prostate cancer and brain tumors.—SOURCE: American Association for Cancer Research, June 22, 2010
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Wine helps deter tooth decay
 
Posted on : 2007-06-26 | Author : Health News Editor
News Category : Health
PAVIA, Italy, June 26 (UPI) Red and white wine are effective in controlling several strains of streptococci bacteria that are involved in tooth decay, found an Italian study. The study, published in the July 11 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, found wine can act as an effective antimicrobial agent against the tested pathogenic oral streptococci and might be active in caries (cavities) and the prevention of upper respiratory tract pathologies. –Study leader Gabriella Gazzani and colleagues point out that previous studies suggested that moderate wine consumption has health benefits after reaching the stomach and digestion — in protecting against heart disease and cancer.–Wine’s antibacterial activity has been recognized since antiquity, when wine was used to treat infected wounds, according to Gazzani of the University of Pavia.
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Recipe on Prevention and Awareness
Take 2 table spoons of ACV, 1,000 mgs of arginine, and 1000mgs of inositol, with a 1/8 of a teaspoon of baking soda. Put the arginine and the inositol with the acv in a glass, swirl the mix til you se the acv and the other components get cloudy. Then add your 2 ounces of water, and your baking soda. Stir or swirl in the glass and when foamy drink down right away. –You will see candida and other fungal infections diminish, You will see pancreas become more effective, less swelling in the midsection, a clearing of intestinal blockages, a good antiinflammatory, if taking before sleep will assist in relaxing stiff aching joints and muscles. A very powerful aid in cancer prevention and elimination.
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Shows of the Week June 28 2010
 
4 Thieves Vinegar
Experts Explore Emerging Evidence Linking Diabetes and Cancer
Tumors Use Sugars To Avoid Programmed Cell Death
Broth– Recipe Gelatin Healing impact Recipe Gelatin and Beet
 
4 Thieves vinegar—what you will need is 8-10 different herbs
Rosemary, Sage, Thyme, Meditereanan Oregano, Clove, Cinnamon, Peppermint, Juniper Berry, Myrrh– and if you like add Milk Thistle, Green Tea, Goji or Wolfberry—put if dried ( all the herbs are dried ) 1 tablespoon of each into a wide mouth jar ( again you can go up or down with this depending on how strong you want it ) then add vinegar ( any type will work )—now you can blend this in a blender before you jar it to break it all down and mush it a bit say 1/2/-1 cup of vinegar—allow to sit for at least 6-8 weeks —some allow it to sit for a year or better—after blend and strain and use 1 tsp daily to offset any potential infection—This can minimize antibiotic resistance and allow your own immune system with the assistance of these herbs to implement in you the ability to become either more adaptable or more resistant to being infected with different maladies

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